Sample #6 (Term paper)

Title: Is Turkey economically ready to join EU?

[…]
Turkey’s candidature for the European Union is maybe the most controversial and consequently well-analyzed of any in the history of the organization. The topics of the debate are familiar: human rights abuses, overly uppermost military, and the impact of Islam on the one hand, contrary to strategic partner, valid candidate, and the advantages of including a Muslim democracy on the other. The interaction among these factors will define Turkey’s progress toward membership over the next several years. Notwithstanding, in theory the EU defines membership eligibility rested on a set of impartial criteria that do not take diplomatic issues into account.

Sample #6 (Term paper)
[…]
The richest areas are concentrated in the western part of the country while the poorest ones are at the eastern frontier. The richest province Kocaeli, an essential manufacturing location, has a GDP per capita of more than 90% above the national average (46% of the EU-25 average). At the other edge of the gradation, the poorest regions Agri and Van have only around one third of the national GDP per capita (8% of the EU-25 average). These profits disparities are displayed in the sectoral structure of the areas.

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Overall, EU Member States’ economies would advance from the admittance of Turkey, albeit only minorly. An advance of growth in Turkey should present a positive influence to EU-25 exports (Cakmak E.H., 1998, p.78). Turkey would advance considerably from its admittance to the EU. Admittance should boost Turkey’s development basically via enlarged trade, higher contribution due to higher FDI, inflows, and higher productivity development due to a change in the sectoral arrangement of output and the accomplishment of structural renovations in line with the more competitive EU internal market setting.

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The production of textiles is Turkey’s biggest industry, very competitive on international level, and the most significant foreign-exchange earner. Domestic cotton and wool supply with much of the raw material for the industry, but synthetics production has also grown. The textile sector gave 20 percent of total manufacturing output in the mid-1990s. The fixed capacity is equal to about 33 percent of that of the EU in conditions of cotton spinning and about 11 percent of EU woolen thread and textiles.
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